California’s Cleaning Product Right to Know Act Requires Ingredient Disclosure

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California became the first state in the nation to have a cleaning products disclosure law, after Governor Brown signed the Cleaning Product Right to Know Act of 2017 (S.B. 258 (Lara)) into law in late 2017.

The Cleaning Product Right to Know Act requires manufacturers of certain cleaning products sold in California to disclose on the product label and on the product’s Internet web site certain information related to known hazardous chemicals contained in the product.  Manufacturers will have until January 1, 2020 to comply with the online disclosure requirements, and until January 1, 2021 to comply with the product label disclosure requirements.  However, any intentionally added ingredient that is regulated by California’s Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act (commonly known as Proposition 65) will not have to be listed until January 1, 2023.

The new law applies to so-called “designated products”, which are defined as a finished product that is an air care product, automotive product, general cleaning product, or a polish or floor maintenance product used primarily for janitorial, domestic or institutional cleaning purposes.  It does not apply to foods, drugs and cosmetics, trial samples, or industrial products specifically manufactured for certain industrial manufacturing processes.

The product label will be required to disclose each intentionally added ingredient contained in the product that is included on any of 22 specified designated chemical lists – including chemicals listed pursuant to Proposition 65.  Alternatively, manufacturers may list all intentionally added ingredients contained in the product unless it is confidential business information.  The Act also requires the disclosure of fragrance allergens greater than 0.01 percent (100 ppm).  Additional requirements include the manufacturer’s toll-free telephone number and Internet web site address on the product label.

As for the online disclosure requirements, manufacturers must list all intentionally added ingredients and state their functional purpose.  All nonfunctional constituents present at above 0.01 percent (100 ppm) must also be listed.  The website must include electronic links for designated lists and a link to the hazard communication safety data sheet for the product.  In addition, specific requirements apply for the disclosure of fragrance allergens online.

The Act also adds a section to the California Labor Code imposing an obligation on employers who are required to provide employees with Safety Data Sheets (SDS).  Those employers must similarly make the printable information from the online disclosure available in the workplace.

Although it is a state law, the effect of the Cleaning Product Right to Know Act is certain to be felt by manufacturers across the country who sell their products into California, as is true of many of California’s other regulatory schemes, including Proposition 65, and will most likely result in a nationwide relabeling of covered products.

Given the Act’s numerous and in some cases highly technical requirements, manufacturers of cleaning products would be well advised to determine whether any of their products are subject to the Act, and take steps now to ensure compliance by 2020.  Conkle, Kremer & Engel attorneys stand ready to help manufacturers handle all that is coming their way.

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California ARB’s Third Product Survey Starts July 1, 2016

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The California Air Resources Board’s ambitious, three-year long data collection effort is rounding third and heading for home.  The mandatory reporting period for the third and final year of the Consumer and Commercial Products Survey (now called “Data Reporting for the Consumer Products Program”) will begin July 1, 2016 and end November 1, 2016.

Businesses will once again be required to report detailed product ingredient information and annual sales for products sold in California during 2015, as they were required to do for chemically formulated consumer and commercial products sold or supplied for use in California during the 2013 and 2014 calendar years.  ARB requires the ingredient and sales information to be reported through its online Consumer Products Reporting Tool.  Veterans of the two prior Surveys may notice that ARB no longer refers to the mandatory reports as “Surveys,” apparently because that name suggested to some that the reports were somehow optional.  They are not optional.  Non-compliance will draw letters from ARB and persistent non-compliance will result in referral to ARB’s Enforcement Division.

Reports must be filed by each “responsible party” listed on the label of a consumer or commercial product that was sold or supplied for use in California during the calendar year, if the product falls into one of the many categories listed for 2015.  The general categories of consumer products that are subject to reporting are personal care products, adhesives, sealants and related products, household and institutional products, pesticide products, solvent and thinning-related products, vehicle and marine vessel aftermarket products, and aerosol coating products.  But for the 2015 Report, ARB has exempted 232 categories of consumer products due to its assessment that the products contain low or no volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions – less than 0.05 tons per day of emissions.  A number of beauty products, including facial cleansers and soaps, nail glues and gel nail polishes, are now exempt from reporting for 2015, even though they were required to be reported for 2013 and 2014 Surveys.  ARB’s full list of exempt consumer products is available here.

Conkle, Kremer & Engel attorneys assist clients with achieving compliance with California’s many regulatory requirements, including the Consumer and Commercial Products Survey, so that clients can focus on expanding their businesses in valuable markets.

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CK&E to Present on Emerging Legal Issues at PCPC Emerging Issues Conference

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Conkle, Kremer & Engel attorneys John Conkle and Kim Sim will once address current legal trends and developments in the cosmetic and personal care products industry at the Personal Care Products Council (PCPC)’s Emerging Issues Conference on November 18, 2015 at the Ritz Carlton Hotel in Marina Del Rey, California.

John and Kim will present on “Emerging Legal Issues in the Cosmetic and Personal Care Products Industry.”  The topics to be discussed include recent developments involving enforcement of prohibitions on container slack fill, trends in lawsuits and agency action concerning advertising, an update on the California Air Resources Board’s ongoing Consumer and Commercial Products Survey, as well as a discussion about protecting companies from counterfeiting and cybersquatting in the digital age.

CK&E’s presentation from last year’s Emerging Issues Conference can be found here.

The annual event by the PCPC – the leading national trade association for the cosmetic and personal care products industry – is a must-attend for beauty companies across the country, with its unique focus on the many challenges that are on the horizon for the beauty industry.

This year’s agenda will also include updates from the PCPC on key issues for the industry and from the California Department of Toxic Substances Control on the California Safer Consumer Products and Workplaces regulations, as well as presentations on emerging issues in the Americas, safety standards for cosmetics, current and future challenges for Proposition 65.  In addition, Deputy Attorney General Robert Sumner is slated to speak at the conference.

CK&E is pleased to once again participate in this annual event and to offer its experience and insight into legal issues affecting the industry to the PCPC and its members.

 

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The Conkle Firm Honors Industry Rock Star Steve Goddard at City of Hope Spirit of Life Award Gala

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PRAVANA Founder and President Steve Goddard literally rocked the house as he joined beauty industry members to “Rock the Cure” at the City of Hope’s Spirit of Life Award Gala in Las Vegas on July 11, 2015.  Conkle, Kremer & Engel attorneys were there to celebrate and support this industry rock star and friend of CK&E as he was honored for his many professional and humanitarian accomplishments.

The Spirit of Life Award is a rare and prestigious honor, presented to exceptional individuals whose intangible qualities – their generosity, their ability to inspire and their desire to make a difference in the world – make their lives worthy of universal admiration.  Steve Goddard embodies each of these qualities.

Steve is a 30-year veteran of the beauty industry.  He founded PRAVANA in 2004 as a boutique brand of highly sophisticated products utilizing the power of  nature and the strength of technology to produce superior holistic formulas.  Since then, PRAVANA has turned into a global brand famously known for high quality, innovative and eco-conscious products. PRAVANA donates 5% of all sales of its NEVO Hair Care line to the City of Hope toward the fight against cancer.   PRAVANA is also an annual participant in Breast Cancer Awareness month and works closely with salons in numerous charitable events and programs including the Ronald McDonald house and the Beauty Bus Foundation.

Steve’s professional achievements and philanthropic efforts were recognized and lauded before his beauty industry peers.  In keeping with the theme of this year’s City of Hope Spirit of Life Gala, “Rock the Cure,” guests were treated to an evening of pure rock and roll.  First Steve, an acclaimed singer, songwriter and guitarist, delighted guests with his own special rock guitar performance.  And what better way to end the celebration than with a musical performance by none other than Don Felder, formerly of the Eagles, who entertained the crowd with Eagles hits, including Hotel California.  It was a fitting tribute to an extraordinary member of the beauty industry.

The City of Hope Spirit of Life Gala is held each year at the Mandalay Bay as a pre-cursor to the Cosmoprof North America beauty industry trade show.  Past Cit of Hope honorees include such industry leaders as Sara Jones, Senior VP and General Manager of Joico (2011), George Schaeffer, founder of OPI and Aloxxi (2012), Reuben Carranza, CEO of Wella (2013) and Harlan Kirschner, President of The Kirschner Group (2014).

CK&E is proud to have been able to join in the celebration of industry veteran and friend of the firm Steve Goddard for his many accomplishments, both professional and humanitarian.  CK&E joins the City of Hope in congratulating Steve on being this year’s City of Hope Spirit of Life Honoree.

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Seriously – Aloe Vera Whole Leaf Extract May be a Prop 65 Chemical

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We’ve recently written a series of articles about “natural” personal care products that may inadvertently run afoul of Prop 65 regulations.  You may be surprised to learn that such “natural” products may include ingredients that have been identified as “chemicals known to the State of California to cause cancer” under Proposition 65.

One of the more surprising of the proposed Prop 65 ingredients is Aloe Vera Whole Leaf Extract.  On April 23, 2015, California’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (“OEHHA”) issued its notice of intent to list Aloe Vera Whole Leaf Extract as a chemical known to cause cancer. Although more than 420 species of Aloe plant exist, the specific form that is the subject of the proposed listing is: “Aloe Vera whole leaf extract” which “consists of the liquid portion of the Aloe Vera leaf and is a natural constituent of the Aloe barbadensis Miller plant.”  Fortunately, OEHHA specifically excludes Aloe Vera decolorized whole leaf extract, Aloe Vera gel, Aloe Vera gel extract and Aloe Vera latex, which are the more common forms used in personal care products.

When it issued the notice of intent to list Aloe Vera Whole Leaf Extract, OEHHA also issued a notice of intent to list Goldenseal Root Powder as a chemical known to cause cancer. OEHHA identified goldenseal root powder in the proposed listing as “the powdered dried roots and underground stems of goldenseal plants” and declared it to be “a natural constituent of the goldenseal plant.” OEHHA further specifies that Goldenseal is also known as Hydrastis Canadensis, orangeroot, Indian turmeric, and curcuma. Fortunately, OEHHA further specifies that the spice turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn.), frequently found in personal care products such as face and body lotions and cleansers, is not proposed for listing. The form of goldenseal root extract that is contemplated for addition to the Prop 65 list is most often used in the form of nutritional supplements.

Even when manufacturing or distributing “natural” products, beauty companies should take care to review the products’ current formulations to determine whether they contain an ingredient that is or may be on the Proposition 65 list, or whether any of their products contain an ingredient that may cause an exposure to a Prop 65 chemical.  It may be vital to work closely with manufacturers or suppliers, and have strong contracts to protect against Proposition 65 liability. Companies should be pro-active and consider reformulation if a proposed or actual Prop 65 chemical is being used.  And if a Proposition 65 Notice of Violation is received, affected companies should promptly contact counsel with experience in successfully resolving Prop 65 claims.

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Natural Products are Not Immune from Prop 65 – Beta Myrcene is a Listed Chemical

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The Conkle firm recently wrote about personal care product ingredients that are found in nature that are nonetheless among those that have been identified by the state of California to be “chemicals known to the State of California to cause cancer” under California’s Proposition 65.

On March 27, 2015, the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (“OEHHA”) added beta-myrcene (CAS No. 123-35-3) as a chemical known to cause cancer under Proposition 65.   This means that enforcement actions may commence starting March 27, 2016. Beta-myrcene is a natural constituent of food plants, such as hop, bay, verbena, lemongrass, citrus, pomegranate, and carrot, and of their juices and essential oils. Beta-myrcene is used as a fragrance in cosmetics and soaps, many of which are positioned  as “natural” products.  Other ingredients that are popularly used in “natural” beauty products are joining the list – check back for our additional blog posts on those in the near future.

In addition to such ingredients, businesses should be careful not to overlook diethanolamine (DEA), coconut oil diethanolamine (cocamide DEA) and benozphenone – three chemicals that became subject to enforcement action in June 2013 and which remain a favorite of Prop 65 plaintiffs. Thousands of companies, with particular focus on beauty industry manufacturers, distributors and retailers have been hit with Notices of Violation over these chemicals.

Beauty companies should review their current formulations to determine whether any of their products contain an ingredient that is or may be on the Proposition 65 list, or whether any of their products contain an ingredient that may cause an exposure to a Proposition 65 chemical. Companies should work closely with their manufacturer or supplier, and have strong contracts to insulate them from Proposition 65 liabilities. Companies should also consider being pro-active by reformulating chemicals out of their products early on, if possible.  If a Notice of Violation is received, contact counsel with experience in successfully resolving Prop 65 claims.

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Beauty Companies Beware: Natural Ingredients May be Subject to Prop 65

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Personal care product companies are riding the wave of strong consumer interest in “natural” products.  However, going “natural” can come at a cost:  In addition to concerns about drawing consumer claims that the term is being used in a potentially deceptive manner, there are other hidden risks to manufacturers, distributors and resellers of “natural” products. Perhaps surprisingly, a number of chemicals that are commonly found as a natural constituent of plants has been or is about to be classified as “chemicals known to the State of California to cause cancer” under California’s Proposition 65.

Pulegone is among the plant extracts found on the Prop 65 list.  Pulegone is a natural constituent of various plants, including mint and other herbs, and of their essential oils.  Pulegone was added to the Prop 65 list on April 18, 2014 as a chemical known to the state of California to cause cancer, and it became subject to enforcement actions a year later, on April 18, 2015.  Prop 65 bounty hunter Mateel Environmental Justice Foundation wasted no time in sending out a 60-Day Notice of Violation to businesses whose products involve exposure to this chemical.  It only took two days for the first Notice of Violation over exposure to pulegone to be served on businesses around the country.  A Notice of Violation is often a pre-cursor to a lawsuit.  The Notice of Violation claims consumer and occupational exposures to pulegone through use in products of pennyroyal oil.

The requirements of Proposition 65 are deceptively simple – provide a clear and reasonable warning if the use of the product results in an exposure to one or more of the 800+ chemicals on the Prop 65 list of known carcinogens and reproductive toxins.  But the penalties, fees and damage to business reputation for failing to comply can be severe:  Under Proposition 65, the civil penalties for failing to provide a clear and reasonable warning prior to exposure can reach up to $2,500 per violation per day, in addition to payment of an enterprising plaintiff’s attorneys’ fees.  Wherever they are located, manufacturers, distributors and retailers can be liable for Prop 65 violations, and the sale of even one product that may cause an exposure to a Prop 65 chemical is subject to zealous pursuit by Prop 65 plaintiffs.  Businesses are well advised to consult with counsel who are familiar with Prop 65 concerns and can help them proactively get ahead of the Prop 65 curve or successfully resolve claims in the event a Notice of Violation is received.

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California’s new Paid Sick Leave Law goes into effect July 1, 2015: Are you ready?

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Starting July 1, 2015, virtually all California employers – regardless of size – will be required to provide employees with paid sick leave.

The new “Healthy Workplaces, Healthy Families Act of 2014” (AB 1522), California Labor Code Section 245 et seq., requires that all employees – full-time, part-time, temporary and seasonal – who have worked for 30 or more days within a year from the beginning of employment, must be given paid sick leave.

Employees who are providers of in-home support services, and employees of air carriers are excluded from the new law. Also excluded are employees who are covered by a collective bargaining agreement that expressly provide for wages, paid sick leave, or hours.

The Healthy Workplaces, Healthy Families Act may have been passed with good intentions, but the Act’s complex and seemingly contradictory accrual, carryover and use requirements and broad scope of permitted use has left many employers feeling ill as they prepare for compliance before the July 1, 2015 effective date.

The paid sick leave accrues at the rate of one hour of paid leave for every 30 hours worked. Thus, a full-time employee working 2,080 hours per year can accrue up to 69.3 hours, or 8.67 days, of paid sick leave. However, under the new law, employers can limit an employee’s use of paid sick days to 3 days or 24 hours in each year of employment. And, while the law requires accrued paid sick days to carry over to the following year of employment, an employer has no obligation to allow an employee’s total accrual of paid sick leave to exceed 6 days or 48 hours.

Fortunately, there appears to be a simple solution for employers wishing to avoid the accrual and carryover requirements. An employer can provide employees with 3 paid sick days (24 paid sick hours assuming eight-hour work days) at the beginning of each calendar year, anniversary date of employment or twelve-month basis.

The new paid sick leave law allows employees to use paid sick days for broad purposes, beyond that employee’s medical care. An employee can take paid sick days for the diagnosis, care or treatment of an existing health condition or preventive care of the employee or a family member. In addition, an employee who is a victim of domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking can use paid sick days for specified purposes, including to obtain a restraining order or to obtain services from a domestic violence program.

An employee can take paid sick days either upon oral or written request. The law provides that if the need for paid sick leave is foreseeable, the employee shall provide reasonable advance notification. If the need for paid sick leave is unforeseeable, the employee shall provide notice of the need for the leave as soon as practicable.

California employers will need to take specific action before July 1, 2015 to ensure that they will be fully compliant with the Act on July 1, 2015.

Employers must provide written notice of the new law to all employees. The California Department of Industrial Relations, Division of Labor Standards Enforcement provides electronic copies of the mandatory workplace postings for employer use on its website.

Employers are also required to provide employees with written notice that sets forth the amount of paid sick leave available, for use on either the employees’ itemized wage statement or in a separate writing provided on the designated pay date with the employees’ payment of wages.

Finally, the Act requires employers to keep for at least three years records documenting the hours worked and paid sick days accrued and used by an employee, and allow the Labor Commissioner to access these records.

Conkle, Kremer & Engel attorneys provide employers with practical guidance and legal expertise to ensure compliance with ever-changing labor laws, including wage and hour issues and successful development and implementation of a sick leave policy that complies with the Healthy Workplaces, Healthy Families Act of 2014.

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Last Call for 2013 CARB Survey Submissions; Deadline for 2014 Survey Coming Soon

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The limited reprieve granted to small businesses for complying with the 2013 Consumer and Commercial Products Survey is coming to an end: Small businesses – defined as companies with 25 or fewer employees – must report 2013 sales and formulation data to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) by no later than July 1, 2015.

For other businesses, the deadline to report 2013 data has passed. Unless they have been granted an extension from CARB, formulators were required to comply by April 1, 2015 and all other businesses, by March 1, 2015.

The 2013 Consumer and Commercial Products Survey is part of a comprehensive three-year data collection effort by CARB, which is authorized by law to collect data about chemically formulated products. The Survey collects formulation data and sales information for chemically formulated consumer and commercial products sold or supplied for use in California during the 2013 calendar year. Compliance with the Survey is mandatory.

The Survey is remarkable in its breadth, targeting virtually all consumer and commercial products. The Survey requires that each “responsible party” listed on the label of a consumer or commercial product that was sold or supplied for use in California during the calendar year, and falls into a category listed on that year’s Survey Category List, is required to report detailed product ingredient information, as well as annual sales on a per-product basis, to CARB through the online Consumer Products Reporting Tool.

The general categories of consumer products that are subject to reporting in 2013 are personal care products, adhesives, sealants and related products, household and institutional products, pesticide products, solvent and thinning-related products, vehicle and marine vessel aftermarket products, and aerosol coating products.

In addition, updated data for the 2014 and 2015 calendar years must also be reported to CARB. Businesses who are required to report should plan for timely compliance with the 2014 Survey, which opens on July 1, 2015. The deadline for reporting 2014 Survey data – including 2014 sales – is November 1, 2015. In addition, CARB expects to begin collecting 2015 data on July 1, 2016 with all 2015 data due by November 1, 2016.

Conkle, Kremer & Engel provides expert guidance to clients as they navigate compliance with California’s complex and ever-changing regulatory requirements, including the Consumer and Commercial Products Survey.

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Beware of Scam Trademark Solicitations

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Trademark applicants and registrants take notice:  There are increasing numbers of domestic and international outfits that issue trademark compliance and renewal notices that look like legitimate invoices or governmental requests.  In actuality, these notices are sent by private individuals or entities trying to make a quick buck.  Some of these notices are solicitations from companies offering to file renewals with the United States Patent & Trademark Office (USPTO) for an exorbitant fee.  Using deceptively official-sounding names such as “United States Trademark Registration Office”, “Trademark and Patent Office” and “Patent & Trademark Agency”, these companies charge excessive fees for routine or unnecessary services or worse, take your money and disappear.  Others, such as IP Data in the Czech Republic, seek to charge a “filing fee” of over $2,400 to publish your trademark in their own private Internet database – an expensive exercise that is not an application for trademark registration and confers no trademark rights.

This problem has become so widespread and severe that the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) published a list of known international trademark registration scams.   The USPTO keeps a similar scammer database, identifying the following organizations that sent non-USPTO solicitations, prompting consumer complaints to the USPTO:

  • TM-DB Register of Protected Trademarks
  • Trademark and Patent Office
  • Trademark Compliance Center (See an example of a scam solicitation sent by TCC)
  • Trademark Registration and Monitoring Office
  • United States Trademark Registration Office
  • Patent & Trademark Agency
  • United States Trademark Maintenance Service
  • U.S. Trademark Compliance Service
  • WDTP
  • WIPT
  • TM Collection
  • TM Edition
  • Patent Trademark Register
  • Register of International Patents and Trademarks
  • Trademark Renewal Service
  • Trademark Safeguard – Trademark Monitoring Service
  • Intellectual Property Agency Ltd.
  • IOPR – Intellectual Property Register
  • GBO, Inc.
  • Intellectual Property Services USA Incorporated
  • USTM Information Services
  • Brand Registration Office

In October 2014, a New York firm successfully won a lawsuit against “Patent & Trademark Agency LLC” for unfair competition and deceptive marketing practices, putting the company out of business.  A Final Consent Judgment was entered against Patent & Trademark Agency LLC, by which it agreed to permanently discontinue marketing and selling trademark registration or renewal services in the United States.

If you receive any unexpected email or correspondence regarding a trademark registration, you should immediately contact the USPTO or your counsel to verify the veracity of the sender and the correspondence.  Conkle, Kremer & Engel assists individuals and companies in all aspects of intellectual property protection, including the filing and maintenance of trademark registrations – and we know how to discriminate legitimate vendors from scammers.

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